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Miniature structure: 17 tasks that explore indoors Design for babies - ArchDaily

Miniature Architecture: 17 Projects that Explore Interior Design for Children

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Miniature Architecture: 17 Projects that Explore Interior Design for Children , NUBO Kindergarten / PAL Design. Image © Michelle Young, Amy PiddingtonNUBO Kindergarten / PAL Design. Image © Michelle Young, Amy Piddington

The world certainly looks different through the eyes of a young child; enormous, intriguing, and somewhat overwhelming, and it has long been believed that what we encounter as children shapes up our perspective of the world. When asked about his childhood memories in Switzerland, Peter Zumthor shared that the memories of his youth contain the deepest architectural experience, which have become reservoirs of the architectural atmospheres and images that he explores in his work as an architect today. 

Having a complete understanding of how children change and grow physically and psychologically throughout their childhood requires an in depth observation of different factors, such as their hereditary traits and genetics, the interactions they have with other children and adults, as well as the environment they are living, playing, and learning in. In celebration of World Children’s Day on November 20th, we look at how architects and designers stimulated children's autonomy and promoted their mental and physical wellbeing through architecture and interior design.

Nía School / Sulkin Askenazi. Image © Aldo C. GraciaNursery in Adamów / xystudio. Image Courtesy of xystudioInnocence in Zen / HAO design.. Image © Hey! CheeseSarreguemines Nursery / Michel Grasso + Paul Le Quernec. Image Courtesy of michel grasso + paul le quernec+ 20

Dr. Maria Montessori, an Italian physician and educator, began to develop her educational method at the beginning of the 20th century. The famed Montessori pedagogy provides techniques and methods that contribute to the healthy development of children by setting up an environment that caters to their physical and mental wellbeing and stimulates their autonomy, self-esteem, and socialization skills.

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NUBO Kindergarten / PAL Design. Image © Michelle Young, Amy PiddingtonNUBO Kindergarten / PAL Design. Image © Michelle Young, Amy Piddington

The method tackles three pillars: the child, the conscious adult, and the prepared environment, all joined together and codependent on one another. This implies that a conscious adult who is well knowledgeable of child development is required to design the environment, one that is calm, peaceful, patient, welcoming, harmonious, and respectful for both the children and adults equally. With that being said, most architects started with the bedroom since it is where the child spends most of their time, and created spaces that follow through with the Montessori methodology, combined with other kid-friendly architectural features.

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Alfornelos Apartament / Miguel Marcelino. Image © Archive Miguel Marcelino photo Lourenço T. AbreuAlfornelos Apartament / Miguel Marcelino. Image © Archive Miguel Marcelino photo Lourenço T. Abreu

Curved Forms

Safety is perhaps one of the topmost priorities when designing children's spaces, and one of the most dangerous features is sharp edges and angles, especially when they're aligned with kids' eye levels or near their heads, hands, and legs. To avoid having to add protective extensions or stickers on the corners of furniture pieces, designers have resorted to designing curved forms with rounded and/or smoothed edges. In terms of aesthetics, curved silhouettes give spaces a young, fun, and modern look that "take us back to our childhood" as explained in ArchDaily's 2020 Interior Design Trends.

WeGrow / Bjarke Ingels Group

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WeGrow / Bjarke Ingels Group. Image © Dave BurkWeGrow / Bjarke Ingels Group. Image © Dave Burk

Sarreguemines Nursery / Michel Grasso + Paul Le Quernec

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Sarreguemines Nursery / Michel Grasso + Paul Le Quernec. Image Courtesy of michel grasso + paul le quernecSarreguemines Nursery / Michel Grasso + Paul Le Quernec. Image Courtesy of michel grasso + paul le quernec

Safe Materials and Fit-outs

It is very critical to keep kids zones bacteria free, which is why parents often prefer to have surfaces that are easy to clean, harsh-chemicals free, and not prone to housing small insects, such as antibacterial glossy or semi-glossy surfaces, microfiber, or vinyl. In terms of fit-outs, interior designers have replaced handles and knobs on drawers and cabinets in kitchens and bedrooms with invisible hardware, ranging from magnetic push latches to integrated handles with concealed beveled edges. Initially, the objective was to have a minimal space with a seamless and sleek look, but designers found them to be appropriate and safe for kids furniture as well. 

Assemble's Brutalist Playground in London

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Assemble's Brutalist Playground in London. Image © Tristan Fewings / Getty Images for RIBA. ImageInstalação recria os playgrounds brutalistas de LondresAssemble's Brutalist Playground in London. Image © Tristan Fewings / Getty Images for RIBA. ImageInstalação recria os playgrounds brutalistas de Londres

Lolly-Laputan Educational Restaurant / Wutopia Lab

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Lolly-Laputan Educational Restaurant / Wutopia Lab. Image © CreatAR ImagesLolly-Laputan Educational Restaurant / Wutopia Lab. Image © CreatAR Images

Blue and Glue / HAO Design

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Blue and Glue / HAO Design. Image © Hey! CheeseBlue and Glue / HAO Design. Image © Hey! Cheese

Scale

In his seminal text Towards a New Architecture, Le Corbusier stated that "a man looks at the creation of architecture with his eyes, which are 5 feet 6 inches from the ground” and not from a standpoint of a young child’s eyes, which are on average, about 3 feet 6 inches from the ground. Interior spaces built for children should be scaled down to match their height and spatial needs, so that they are able to move around and interact with the space without the intervention or help of an adult. In addition, being in smaller-scaled spaces removes the feeling of being overpowered caused by regular sized rooms and furniture pieces, allowing kids to feel more safe and unrestrained.

Michelberger Hotel, Room 304 / Sigurd Larsen

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Michelberger Hotel, Room 304 / Sigurd Larsen. Image © Rita LinoMichelberger Hotel, Room 304 / Sigurd Larsen. Image © Rita Lino

Ouchi / HIBINOSEKKEI, Youji no Shiro, Kids Design Labo

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Ouchi / HIBINOSEKKEI, Youji no Shiro, Kids Design Labo. Image © Taku Hibino by HIBINOSEKKEI - Youji no ShiroOuchi / HIBINOSEKKEI, Youji no Shiro, Kids Design Labo. Image © Taku Hibino by HIBINOSEKKEI - Youji no Shiro

Interactive Spaces that Promote Physical Activity

To further promote healthy physical and mental growth, architects have designed spaces that enable natural creativity and freedom of playing and exploring, whether it's through stacked geometric structures or built-in games and entertainment, since kids learn best through physical engagement in the form of games or physical exercises. And while some parents prefer to refrain from using digital screens and technology at such a young age, others like to engage their children early on through interactive screens built into their playrooms.  

Innocence in Zen / HAO design

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Innocence in Zen / HAO design.. Image © Hey! CheeseInnocence in Zen / HAO design.. Image © Hey! Cheese

Nía School / Sulkin Askenazi

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Nía School / Sulkin Askenazi. Image © Aldo C. GraciaNía School / Sulkin Askenazi. Image © Aldo C. Gracia

Surfaces that Enable the Use of Senses

In addition to the digital screens mentioned above, the use of textured surfaces has proved to further enhance children's sensory receptors. Surfaces that create sound with friction or change colors help stimulate kids' senses. The same can be said for chalk or white boards, which help children improve their motor skills through drawing and painting. Mirrors, for instance, stimulate children’s recognition of their own body and face, and helps them learn how to identify facial expressions and emotions. 

Kids Smile Labo Nursery / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro

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Kids Smile Labo Nursery / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro. Image © HIBINOSEKKEIKids Smile Labo Nursery / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro. Image © HIBINOSEKKEI

Charles House / Austin Maynard Architects

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Charles House / Austin Maynard Architects. Image © Peter BennettsCharles House / Austin Maynard Architects. Image © Peter Bennetts

Accessibility and Adaptability

One of the most important characteristics of child-oriented architecture is child-only features, allowing them to rely solely on themselves. Similar to scale, accessible architecture gives room for children to explore and navigate the space themselves, however, no child is the same, and each age group has a different set of spatial needs. This is why it is recommended that spaces be flexible, evolving in parallel to children's growth.

Geometrical Space for a Two Kid Family / Atelier D+Y

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Geometrical Space for a Two Kid Family / Atelier D+Y. Image © EnvanerGeometrical Space for a Two Kid Family / Atelier D+Y. Image © Envaner

My Secret Garden / Yestudio

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My Secret Garden / Yestudio. Image © ClivelanMy Secret Garden / Yestudio. Image © Clivelan

Openness to the Outdoors

Children are not meant to be confined to one particular space; It is at this age where they get to use all their senses to explore the world around them. Taking into account the importance of outdoors, architects and incorporated access to nature through direct sunlight, extended landscape from the outdoors, or water features. Projects built on the ground floor benefit from direct access to adjacent landscapes, giving children room to be out in the open. 

Act for Kids / m3architecture

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Act for Kids / m3architecture. Image Courtesy of m3architectureAct for Kids / m3architecture. Image Courtesy of m3architecture

AKN Nursery / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro

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AKN Nursery / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro. Image © Studio BauhausAKN Nursery / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro. Image © Studio Bauhaus

Color Palette

According to the Montessori method, having a lot of colors and textures in the same environment can cause confusion and irritation for children, especially those at the younger age spectrum. Therefore, the method recommends to select very few options to facilitate the development of decision-making capacities.

Nursery in Adamów / xystudio

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Nursery in Adamów / xystudio. Image Courtesy of xystudioNursery in Adamów / xystudio. Image Courtesy of xystudio

Hangzhou Neobio Family Park / X+Living

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Hangzhou Neobio Family Park / X+Living. Image © Feng ShaoHangzhou Neobio Family Park / X+Living. Image © Feng Shao

Find more interiors designed for children in this My ArchDaily folder created by the author.

This article is part of an ArchDaily series that explores features of interior architecture, from our own database of projects. Every month, we will highlight how architects and designers are utilizing new elements, new characteristics and new signatures in interior spaces around the world. As always, at ArchDaily, we highly appreciate the input of our readers. If you think we should mention specific ideas, please submit your suggestions.



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